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Moir

Moir
07.05.11 - 28.05.11


Art and politics make, to borrow a neat phrase from political commentary, strange bedfellows. There is certainly a version of politics - ephatically with a lowercase 'p' - at work in all art: the manipulation of material and concept; the management of visual presentation with audience perception; and. perhaps most importantly, the conflict of results against intention, of the limitations of production against the desire for an ideal. But overtly political art, that is, by my own indistinct definition, art actively attempting to deal with political issues rather than merely expose or display them, often suffers from a severe case of academic anaemia, becoming studious, dry, bureaucratic, and civil; becoming, in other words, too much like politics and not enough like art. Josh Whitaker draws from political source material does not make overtly political art. The apparent subjects of his work operate on a different level to the means and material by which they are presented. Out of dead imagery and dead ideologies he has built an architecture alive with immediacy. Vibrant and curious, the works co-exist without co-dependence, they add colour to one another, and nudge and prompt like actors on a stage.